ADFs are not loans and are not agreements to lend an amount to another party on an unsecured basis at a pre-agreed interest rate. Their nature as an IRD product produces only the effect of leverage and the ability to speculate or secure interests. In other words, a Discount Rate Agreement (FRA) is a short-term, tailored and agreed-upon financial futures contract. A transaction fra is a contract between two parties for the exchange of payments on a deposit, the notional amount, which must be determined later on the basis of a short-term interest rate called the benchmark rate over a predetermined period. FRA transactions are introduced as a hedge against changes in interest rates. The buyer of the contract blocks the interest rate to protect against an interest rate hike, while the seller protects against a possible drop in interest rates. At maturity, no funds exchange hands; On the contrary, the difference between the contractual interest rate and the market interest rate is exchanged. The purchaser of the contract is paid when the published reference rate is higher than the fixed rate agreed by contract and the buyer pays the seller if the published reference rate is lower than the fixed rate agreed by contract. A company trying to guard against a possible interest rate hike would buy FRAs, while a company seeking interest coverage against a possible interest rate cut would sell FRAs. Since FRAs are charged on the settlement date – the start date of the fictitious loan or deposit – liquid severance pay, the interest rate differential between the market interest rate and the FRA contract rate determines the risk for each party. It is important to note that there is no major cash flow, as the amount of capital is a fictitious amount. The buyer of an appointment contract enters into the contract to protect against a future rise in interest rates.

On the other hand, the seller enters into the contract to protect himself from a future interest rate cut. For example, a German bank and a French bank could enter into a semi-annual term rate contract, under which the German bank would pay a fixed interest rate of 4.2% and receive the variable principal rate of 700 million euros. A advance rate agreement (FRA) is ideal for an investor or company that wants to lock in an interest rate. They allow participants to make a known interest payment at a later date and obtain an unknown interest payment. This helps protect investors from the volatility of future interest rate movements. With the conclusion of an FRA, the parties agree to an interest rate for a given period beginning at a future date, based on the principal set at the opening of the contract.