Both of your tenants must sign both, as they are thus “jointly and severally liable”, which gives you better rights if you have to collect a debt. I would be reluctant to change what has been around for a while and has worked well for you, but if you`re happy to sign only one of you as an owner, I don`t see it making much difference to anything. The main thing is that both tenants sign. However, remember that if the rental agreement now goes to the name of a landlord, you need to make sure that he or she is the one signing official communications, etc. If you do, be very clear with the tenants to contact if necessary. We have a property that consists of a number of buildings, one of which is under a protected lease that we must either sell or renovate. We had informal discussions about this with the tenants, who suggested that they were ready to move. In such circumstances, we understand that we need to find “suitable alternative housing”, but we are not aware of what this means exactly. As for how, it would be another apartment that has a protected lease.

The couple is older and we want to find a solution that is pleasant for all parties instead of ending up in court. But so far, the local authority has only said that we have to resign before they do anything. The initial 12-month lease ended a few months ago. In my absence, my friend extended the lease for two years (at the time, he couldn`t contact me because I was out of the country). I really need more information to answer it – do you use license agreements because you share your property with sub-tenants? If this is not the case and your “tenants” use only real estate, they may very well have rental rights and therefore have greater security than a license indicates. As I live in Scotland, I was wondering how my rental was perceived under the Housing Act? Where am I with this owner? Be nice, but firm – in civil law, you don`t have to terminate more than a month in advance, and although you agreed to two months as part of the deal, I think the rental agent himself would have a hard time complying with an unfair term. Take the agent to small claims court if they try to withhold your down payment and file a complaint with their management body. . . .